High School Curriculum

Course-Offerings-and-Descriptions May 2021

English

 

English 1201 (Academic)

English 1201 is designed for the majority of students entering Level I of senior high school. The study of language and experiences with a broad range of literature and media texts will enable students to reflect on their own learning strategies as they continue to develop confidence as language users.

 

English 1202 (Non-Academic)

English 1202 is designed for students entering senior high school who have demonstrated difficulties with reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The pace, scope, emphases, and resources of English 1202 will allow students to build on their ability to read, view, and respond to a variety of texts, and to express their ideas and understandings through writing, speaking, and other ways of representing meaning.

 

English 1204

This course provides students with significant instruction and practice in literacy skills that will help them in all courses at the senior high level. It places emphasis on the student as a learner and promotes differentiated instruction and assessment to meet the individual needs of students. Literacy 1204 aims to focus on students’ comprehension and metacognition in all aspects of their lives. Literacy 1204 is intended to be taken concurrently with English 1202. Students enrolled in English 1201 cannot receive credit for Literacy 1204.

 

English 2201/ English 3201 (Academic)

The academic courses intended for students whose goals include post-secondary study. Emphasis on literary texts and greater sophistication in texts studied and produced by students. Focus on research is academic and several essays and longer pieces of work are expected.

 

English 2202/ English 3202 (Non-Academic)

The English courses intended for students whose goals include school success, trades programs, or entry-level employment in the private sector. Emphasis is placed on texts that address issues of immediate relevance and “high interest”, and practical oral communication, especially that related to the world of work.

 

Optional Language Arts

Writing 2203

A course designed to accommodate a wide range of student interests and abilities. It offers students an opportunity to explore writing as a means of personal expression as well as a method of communication. The course provides opportunities for students to develop a portfolio of written products.

 

Drama 2206 (see below): This course meets Optional Language Arts and Fine Arts credits.

             

Fine Arts

 

Applied Music (Music – Instrumental) 2206/3206

These courses offer students the opportunity to develop musical skills, understandings, and competencies as instrumentalists through individual and small group experiences. Applied Music may be offered as Band (Brass/Woodwinds), and Percussion. Students will develop musicianship, literacy skills, and musical and theoretical understandings. This comprehensive approach will allow students to integrate the practical, theoretical, and conceptual aspects of music. Students acquire generic performing skills related to all applied areas – phrasing, articulation, intonation, tone quality, expressive devices, interpretation, style; specific performing skills unique to the individual applied area; theoretical concepts – elements of music (rhythm/meter, melody, harmony, and form), musical literacy, and appropriate symbols and terms.

 

Ensemble performance 1105/2105/3105

These courses provide the opportunity for students to perform in a group context, e.g., choir, band and are divided into three levels in which musical concepts are revisited as technical skills are refined. The three levels are progressive for the individual student through the introduction of new and varied repertoire each year. Students learn about music by making music. Students acquire performance and musicianship skills, rehearsal and performance behavior, an understanding of conducting gesture and other forms of nonverbal communication, production of sound, and appreciation of music as an art form through ensemble performance.

 

Experiencing Music 2200

This course is designed to provide an outlet for people with an interest in popular musical forms. This class encourages the learning of instruments such as guitar, bass, drums, piano/keyboard and being able to develop skills related to the commercial music industry. The use of computer technology is used to develop recording skills and musical notation. No experience is required for this class, but it is encouraged that students have some limited experience on an instrument.

 

Drama 2206

Drama 2206 offers a practical overview for drama education used for learning and teaching in and through drama. In a learning community, stakeholders, working in a collaborative fashion will use its guidelines for making decisions around the contexts of the learning environment, learning experiences, instructional strategies, and assessment strategies. This curriculum describes learning experiences for senior high learners that will develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that they need to effectively express their thoughts, ideas, and feelings in the area of dramatic arts.

 

Art and Design 2200 & 3200

This studio course offers students the opportunity to develop personal imagery in a variety of media. Three studio units of the following eight will be explored in the year: Drawing, Sculpture, Photography, Fiber Arts, Painting, Printmaking, Graphic Design, and Pottery.

 

Visual Art 1202

Visual Art 1202 is designed as a practical foundational course that can be expanded and elaborated upon in studio courses at higher grade levels. In Visual Art 1202, students will build upon prior experiences with the elements and principles of design. Students will develop foundational and media specific skills and techniques as they create art using a range of media within the disciplines of drawing, painting, printmaking, and sculpture.

 

Students will reflect upon and learn to critically analyze artwork they view and create within contexts across a spectrum of time periods and cultures. Through informed, creative art-making and viewing experiences, students will delve into new ideas, materials, and processes for artistic exploration and experimentation.

 

Clothing 1101/Textiles 3101

Topics covered include basic textiles, wardrobe planning, and fabric and pattern selection. A sewing project is the main focus of this course. Emphasis is on textiles, fibers, yarns, fabrication methods and finishes, and on the application of this knowledge in consumer decision making. Topics: technology of textiles, sociological and aesthetic aspects of clothing, career opportunities.

 

Science

 

Science 1206 (Academic)

Science 1206 is an academic Pan-Canadian science course that aims to develop scientific literacy. Scientific literacy is an evolving combination of the science related attitudes, skills, and knowledge students need to develop inquiry, problem-solving, and decision-making abilities; to become lifelong learners; and to maintain a sense of wonder about the world around them.

NOTE: Science 1206 is required for graduating high school with honors or academic standing.

 

Science 1206 is intended to be an introductory academic science course before taking Physics, Chemistry, Biology or Earth Systems courses. It is composed of four units that contain core labs. All schools are expected to complete these core labs.

 

Science 2200 (Non-Academic)

Science 2200 is an activity-based course designed to contribute to the development of basic concepts and skills through the study of Life Science and Earth/Space Science including the core topics of Ecology and Weather. Throughout this course students are provided opportunity to develop their scientific literacy by engaging in the process of Inquiry, Problem Solving, and Decision Making. Core activities provide opportunity for students to develop practical laboratory skills and to engage in scientific process. STSE (Science, Technology, Society, and Environment) Modules provide students with opportunity to go beyond the facts to examine how science permeates our everyday lives.

 

Science 3200 (Non-Academic)

Science 3200 is an activity-based course designed to contribute to the development of basic concepts and skills through the study of Physical Science including the core topics of Chemistry and Physics. Throughout this course students are provided opportunity to develop their scientific literacy by engaging in the process of Inquiry, Problem Solving, and Decision Making. Core activities provide opportunity for students to develop practical laboratory skills and to engage in scientific process. STSE (Science, Technology, Society, and Environment) Modules provide students with opportunity to go beyond the facts to examine how science permeates our everyday lives.

 

Biology 2201 (Academic)

Biology 2201 is an academic Pan-Canadian science course that aims to develop scientific literacy. Scientific literacy is an evolving combination of the science related attitudes, skills, and knowledge students need to develop inquiry, problem-solving, and decision-making abilities; to become lifelong learners; and to maintain a sense of wonder about the world around them.

             

Biology 2201 is composed of four units that contain core labs and core STSE sections (Science, Technology, Society, and the Environment). All schools are expected to complete these core areas and adhere to the sequence of units outlined for the course.

 

Biology 3201 (Academic)

Biology 3201 is an academic Pan-Canadian science course that aims to develop scientific literacy. Scientific literacy is an evolving combination of the science related attitudes, skills, and knowledge students need to develop inquiry, problem-solving, and decision-making abilities; to become lifelong learners; and to maintain a sense of wonder about the world around them.

 

Chemistry 2202 (Academic)

Chemistry 2202 is an academic Pan-Canadian science course that aims to develop scientific literacy. Scientific literacy is an evolving combination of the science related attitudes, skills, and knowledge students need to develop inquiry, problem-solving, and decision-making abilities; to become lifelong learners; and to maintain a sense of wonder about the world around them.

NOTES: Thorough knowledge of the Chemical Reactions unit in Science 1206 is required before beginning Chemistry 2202. Chemistry 2202 is a pre-requisite for Chemistry 3202.

Chemistry 2202 is composed of three units that contain core labs and core STSE sections (Science, Technology, Society, and the Environment).

 

Chemistry 3202 (Academic)

Chemistry 3202 is an academic Pan-Canadian science course that aims to develop scientific literacy. Scientific literacy is an evolving combination of the science related attitudes, skills, and knowledge students need to develop inquiry, problem-solving, and decision-making abilities; to become lifelong learners; and to maintain a sense of wonder about the world around them.

 

Physics 2204 (Academic)

Physics 2204 is an academic Pan-Canadian science course that aims to develop scientific literacy. Scientific literacy is an evolving combination of the science related attitudes, skills, and knowledge students need to develop inquiry, problem-solving, and decision-making abilities; to become lifelong learners; and to maintain a sense of wonder about the world around them.

NOTE: Physics 2204 is a pre-requisite for Physics 3204.

Physics 2204 is composed of four units that contain core labs and core STSE sections (Science, Technology, Society, and the Environment).

 

Physics 3204 (Academic)

Physics 3204 is an academic Pan-Canadian science course that aims to develop scientific literacy. Scientific literacy is an evolving combination of the science related attitudes, skills, and knowledge students need to develop inquiry, problem-solving, and decision-making abilities; to become lifelong learners; and to maintain a sense of wonder about the world around them.

NOTES: Physics 2204 is a pre-requisite for Physics 3204. Physics 3204: three units that contain core labs and core STSE sections (Science, Technology, Society, and the Environment).

 

Earth Systems 3209 (Academic)

Earth Systems 3209 is an academic provincial science course that aims to develop scientific literacy. Scientific literacy is an evolving combination of the science related attitudes, skills, and knowledge students need to develop inquiry, problem-solving, and decision-making abilities; to become lifelong learners; and to maintain a sense of wonder about the world around them.

Environmental Science 3205 (Academic)

Environmental Science 3205 is an academic Pan-Canadian science course that aims to develop scientific literacy. Scientific literacy is an evolving combination of the science related attitudes, skills, and knowledge students need to develop inquiry, problem-solving, and decision- making abilities; to become lifelong learners; and to maintain a sense of wonder about the world around them.

 

Environmental Science 3205 provides students with an introduction to the content of environmental science. This course is activity-oriented and employs a variety of learning/teaching strategies that emphasize the development of higher-level process skills. Through objective and critical examination of present environmental management and conservation procedures, an appreciation for the need of creating a sustainable environment is promoted.

 

Social Studies

 

Social Studies 1201 (Academic)

This course is designed to meet the academic needs of the majority of students. It is highly recommended for students considering a university program in areas such as the arts, business, education, law, and police studies as it provides exposure to foundational content and skills. This course introduces students to (i) citizenship and civics in a Canadian context, and (ii) microeconomics and macroeconomics.

  • Power, Privilege, & Active Citizenship
  • Human Rights
  • Canada’s Political System
  • Canadian Law
  • Economic Decision-making
  • Demand and Supply
  • Specialization and Trade
  • Government and the Economy

 

Social Studies 1202 (Non-Academic)

This course is designed to provide students with the understandings and critical-thinking skills for students planning to enter into the trades or directly enter the workforce.

  • Power, Privilege, & Active Citizenship
  • Human Rights
  • Canada’s Political System
  • Canadian Law
  • Economic Decision-making
  • Demand and Supply
  • Specialization and Trade
  • Government and the Economy

 

Newfoundland and Labrador Studies 2205 (Academic)

This course examines the culture and heritage of the province. It draws from the content and processes used in both the arts and the social sciences to encourage students to think deeply about “this place”. Students represent their knowledge and understandings using forms such as drama, photography, song, and storytelling. Students become better informed citizens who can contribute to shaping the future of the province. They serve as culture-bearers, helping preserve the rich, diverse culture and varied history of “this place”.

 

Social Studies 2201 (Academic)

This course engages students in an examination of the human experience and the complex relationships between ideas, economics, politics, and international relations; students develop the ability to investigate and respond cogently to multifaceted questions.

 

This course provides the necessary context for topics examined in Social Studies 3201. Topics include:

  • Ideas, Innovation and Technological Change
  • Governance and the Rights of Citizens
  • Capitalism and Responses to Inequality
  • Conflict and Cooperation

 

Social Studies 2202 (Non-Academic)

This course engages students in an examination of the human experience and the complex relationships between ideas, economics, politics, and international relations; students develop the ability to investigate and respond cogently to multifaceted questions.

 

The topics are the same as those in Social Studies 2201, with reduced depth of treatment. Topics include:

  • Ideas, Innovation and Technological Change
  • Governance and the Rights of Citizens
  • Capitalism and Responses to Inequality

Note: Social Studies 1202 is recommended before students attempt Social Studies 2202.

 

Social Studies 3201 (Academic)

Building on Social Studies 2201, this academic course asks students to examine various quality-of-life experiences that humans face today and to consider how quality of life can be improved for all humanity. This examination integrates economic, environmental, political, and social perspectives as well as the themes of quality of life, globalization, and sustainability. Students continue to improve their ability to investigate and respond cogently to complex issues. Topics include:

  • Quality of Life
  • Globalization and Sustainability
  • Political Economy
  • Population Change
  • Environmental Issues
  • Responding to Issues

 

Social Studies 3202 (Non-Academic)

This course asks students to examine and respond to various issues related to quality of life. In responding to these issues, students consider how quality of life can be improved for everyone. Students use economic, environmental, political, and social perspectives, as well as the themes of quality of life, globalization, and sustainability. Students continue to improve their ability to investigate and respond cogently to issues.

 

The topics are the same as those in Social Studies 3201, with reduced depth of treatment. Topics include:

 

  • Quality of Life
  • Globalization and Sustainability
  • Political Economy
  • Population Change
  • Environmental Issues
  • Responding to Issues

 

Career Development

 

Career 2201

This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to explore the changes that are taking place in the world of work. Students learn how to interpret, assess, and reassess the constant changes in the labour market. They will examine the issues and trends that affect education, training, and employment opportunities. This course also requires thirty hours of community service in order for students to receive credit for the course.

 

Physical Education

 

Healthy Living 1200

This course provides opportunities for students to examine and reflect on issues that affect their health and well-being. They examine health indicators and health practices, investigate relevant health issues, explore activities that improve life skills and enhance capability to positively affect health and well- being in four key areas: Active Living, Healthy Eating, Controlling Substances, and Personal Dynamics.

 

Physical Education 2100/2101

Physical Education 2100 and 2101 are activity-based courses designed to provide a variety of movement experiences, contribute to students’ competency in movement, increase student involvement in choosing activities and to instill in students: the understanding that personal fitness/wellness is within their control; the confidence, motivation and responsibility required to pursue and maintain a healthy active lifestyle; that a key element of student achievement in physical education is the contributions of all students to the success and enjoyment of others as all cooperate and participate together.

 

Physical Education 3100/3101

Physical Education 3100/3101 is an activity-based course designed to promote an active healthy lifestyle through a variety of movement experiences that contribute to physical literacy. Students will:

  • Learn and develop movement skills that will permit and motivate students to participate regularly in lifelong physical activity.
  • Use the Active for Life student resource to complement work in the gym/outdoors.
  • Increase their involvement in choosing activities in which they participate.
  • Build an understanding that personal fitness/wellness is within their control.
  • Develop confidence, motivation and responsibility required to maintain an active lifestyle.

Mathematics

 

Mathematics 1201 (Academic)

Mathematics 1201 is the first course in the Academic/Advanced Program for High School Mathematics in Newfoundland Labrador (It replaces the previous Mathematics 1204 course.) This 2-credit course is a pre-requisite course for Mathematics 2201 (Academic) and Mathematics 2200 (Advanced). This program is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs. Students who complete the advanced program will be better prepared for programs that require the study of calculus. Both the Academic and Advanced programs aim to prepare students to make connections between mathematics and its applications and to become numerate adults, using mathematics to contribute to society.

 

Mathematics 1202 (Non-Academic)

Mathematics 1202 is the first course in the Applied Program for High School Mathematics in Newfoundland Labrador (It replaces the previous Mathematics 1206 course.) This 2-credit course is a pre-requisite course for Mathematics 2202 (Applied). This program is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into some post- secondary programs (Trades and some technical programs) or direct entry into the workforce. Students should consult with their Mathematics Teacher and/or Guidance Counselor regarding what programs this course will qualify them for.

 

Mathematics 2200 (Advanced)

Advanced Mathematics 2200 is the second course in the Academic/Advanced Program for High School Mathematics. This 2-credit course is a pre-requisite course for Mathematics 3200 (Advanced) and Mathematics 3208 (Introduction to Calculus). This program is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs. Students who complete the advanced program will be better prepared for programs that require the study of calculus. Both the Academic and Advanced programs aim to prepare students to make connections between mathematics and its applications and to become numerate adults, using mathematics to contribute to society.

 

Mathematics 2201 (Academic)

Mathematics 2201 is the second course in the Academic Program for High School Mathematics in Newfoundland Labrador (It replaces the previous Mathematics 2204 course.) This 2-credit course is a pre-requisite course for Mathematics 3201 (Academic). This program is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into post- secondary programs. The academic mathematics program is intended to help students make connections between mathematics and its applications and to become numerate adults, using mathematics to contribute to society.

 

Mathematics 2202 (Non-Academic)

Mathematics 2202 is the first course in the Applied Program for High School Mathematics in Newfoundland Labrador (It replaces the previous Mathematics 2206 course.) This program is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into some post-secondary programs (Trades and some technical programs) or direct entry into the workforce.

             

 

Mathematics 3200 (Advanced)

Mathematics 3200 is the third course in the Advanced Program for High School Mathematics in Newfoundland & Labrador. It replaces the previous Mathematics 3205 course. This program is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs that require the study of calculus – specifically (but not limited to) the areas of science, mathematics and/or engineering. The Advanced Program aims to prepare students to make connections between mathematics and its applications and to become numerate adults, using mathematics to contribute to society.

 

Mathematics 3201 (Academic)

Mathematics 3201 is the final course in the Academic Program for High School Mathematics in Newfoundland Labrador. It replaces the previous Mathematics 3204 course. This program is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into post-secondary programs. The Academic Program aims to prepare students to make connections between mathematics and its applications and to become numerate adults, using mathematics to contribute to society.

 

Mathematics 3202 (Non-Academic)

Mathematics 3202 is the final course in the Applied Program for High School Mathematics in Newfoundland & Labrador. It replaces the previous Mathematics 3206 course. This program is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical-thinking skills identified for entry into some post-secondary programs (most trades and some technical programs) or direct entry into the workforce. Students should consult with their Mathematics Teacher and/or Guidance Counselor regarding the specific post-secondary programs in which they would be qualified to enroll upon completion of the Applied Program.

 

Mathematics 3208 (Advanced)

Mathematics 3208 is the fourth (and optional) course in the Advanced Program for High School Mathematics in Newfoundland & Labrador. This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the fundamental topics generally found in any first-year university calculus course. The Advanced Program aims to prepare students to make connections between mathematics and its applications and to become numerate adults, using mathematics to contribute to society. Students who enroll in the Mathematics 3208 course will have the option to write the Memorial University Mathematics 1000 exam in June to obtain university credit/grade.

 

Other Required Courses

 

Economic Education Category:

 

Consumer Studies 1202

Consumer Studies 1202 is an elective course suitable for and available to all senior high students. It is a generalized study of consumerism which selects knowledge from the disciplines of law, business education, family studies, mathematics, and economics, and makes application to the marketplace for the purpose of helping the student become a wise consumer.

             

Entrepreneurship 3209

Entrepreneurship 3209 introduces students to the role of business and entrepreneurship in society.

 

The course begins with an examination of foundational business and economic concepts. Students will gain an understanding of these concepts as well as a vocabulary and framework to discuss entrepreneurial opportunities. Students will look at the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs and successful businesses. They will also engage in the process of venture opportunity identification and evaluation.

 

 

French Category:

 

Français 1202

This is a language development courses which offers students an opportunity to study the culture of francophones who reside in Canadian provinces other than Quebec. The starting point for the course is the French community groups of Newfoundland and Labrador. Using literary works which explore aspects of la francophonie and writings on topical issues, it aims both to develop and refine communication skills, and to provide insight into the linguistic and cultural reality of francophones in Canadian regions.

 

Français 2202/3202

These are language development courses. This course also offers students an opportunity to study the culture of francophones who reside in Quebec. Using literary works, which explore aspects of la francophonie and writings on topical issues, the course aims both to develop and refine communication skills, and to provide insight into the linguistic and cultural reality of francophones in Quebec.

 

French 1200

This course enables students to develop second language proficiency through the purposeful use of language. Students engage in authentic tasks with a focus on oral production oral interaction, reading and viewing, and writing and representing. Topics include adolescent life, travel, and the world about me.

 

French 2200

This course is intended to develop students’ ability to acquire information and communicate their needs, desires, and ideas in French. Topics treated include family, home, friends, leisure activities, and daily schedule.

 

French 3200

This course continues the development of language proficiency in French by having students use the language in meaningful contexts to make sense of events, tasks, and activities. Topics explored include family relationships, school, career options, part-time work, media, travel, individual responsibilities, stress, and social concerns. The course includes a 15- minute oral proficiency interview as part of student assessment. French 3200 provides the necessary language base to enable students to study French 3201 and to register for university level French courses.

 

French 3201

The course is structured around the study of content that reflects francophone culture. French is the language of instruction and the language in which students discuss, read, and write about content.

 

Religious Education:

 

World Religions 3101/3106

World Religions 3101 is a study of the living belief systems: Aboriginal Spirituality, Early Religions

(Zoroastrianism, Jainism, Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto), Hinduism, and Buddhism. World Religions 3101 is not a prerequisite for World Religions 3106. Students may choose to complete one or both courses.

 

World Religions 3106 is a study of the living belief systems: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Sikhism, Religion Today (various topics and reference to Baha’i). World Religions 3101 is not a prerequisite for World Religions 3106. Students may choose to complete one or both courses.

 

Technology Education/Skilled Trades (Meet ORC Graduation Requirement):

 

Skilled Trades 1201

Skilled Trades 1201 is a course intended to introduce high school students to the designated trades available within the province. The course takes a brief look at the Red Seal certification training programs and employment opportunities available. The course provides opportunities for students to become familiar with the rights and privileges as detailed under Workplace Occupational Health and Safety Act.

 

Much of the time for this course will be spend on Hands-On projects which are designed to allow the student to experience some of the activities that trades people would be expected to complete within a typical workday. Given the large number of training programs available, five areas of interest have been selected for study within the scope of this course, these include Carpentry, Plumbing, Electrical, Panting and Drywall, Ceramic and Masonry. Students will also be provided opportunities to develop the skills and knowledge necessary to interpret technical drawings or prints.

 

Residential Construction 2201

Residential Construction Technology 2201 is a skilled trade’s course that provides the student with opportunities to explore some of the day-to-day duties that trades’ people in the residential construction industry complete. Units of study include developing an awareness of the Apprenticeship/ Red Seal program certification process, Occupational Health and Safety Act with a focus on the adolescence worker and basic print reading skills. The course also provides “Hands On” experience on the installation of windows, doors, vinyl siding, roofing, flooring materials, stairs, ductwork, and Smart house wiring techniques.

 

Communications Technology 2104/3104

This course is designed to introduce the student to the broad area of technologies involved in communications. A variety of communication areas such as audio, video, graphics, animation, etc., are introduced through specific computer applications. Students are also expected to gain a more technical understanding of more theoretical topics such as how the Internet and other communications networks actually work. Students will spend considerable time producing and publishing web-based materials to their personal web / digital portfolio. Opportunity will be given for limited exposure to basic computer programming, simple electronics and even robotics.

 

Robotics Systems Technology 3205

Robotics Systems Technology 3205 is a Technology Education course that introduces students to robotics through the investigation of the electromechanical systems that are used in robots and basic computer programming using Visual Basic. Throughout this course student design teams will develop solutions to authentic problems. Students will use the knowledge and skills acquired in the first four units of the course to design and build a robot in Unit 5. This course is intended for students who have an interest in computer programming, electronics and robotics and may wish to pursue postsecondary opportunities in such technologies upon graduation from high school.

 

Design and Fabrication 1202

This course explores the use of computer-aided-design software to create products in a fabrication site, as well as, using simple hand and power tools to manipulate plastics, woods, and light materials.

 

Workplace Safety 3220

This course is designed to introduce students to the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of safety in the workplace. Students will achieve certificates in First aid (emergency) and WHMIS (Workplace hazardous materials information system).

 

Family Studies Category:

 

Clothing 1101/Textiles 3101

Topics covered include basic textiles, wardrobe planning, and fabric and pattern selection. A sewing project is the main focus of this course. Emphasis is on textiles, fibers, yarns, fabrication methods and finishes, and on the application of this knowledge in consumer decision making. Topics: technology of textiles, sociological and aesthetic aspects of clothing, career opportunities.

 

Healthy Living 1200 (also meets ORC category for graduation requirement)

This course provides opportunities for students to examine and reflect on issues that affect their health and well-being. They examine health indicators and health practices, investigate relevant health issues, explore activities that improve life skills and enhance capability to positively affect health and well- being in four key areas: Active Living, Healthy Eating, Controlling Substances, and Personal Dynamics.

 

Nutrition 2102/3103

The three curriculum units for Nutrition 2102 are: Food Choices and Nutritional Needs; Food Selection, Preparation and Storage; and Menu and Meal Planning. Food laboratories are part of this course with a minimum requirement of eight lab experiences. Labs are to be chosen in accordance with the guidelines outlined in the appendix of the curriculum guide.

 

While Nutrition 2102 is not a prerequisite for Nutrition 3102, the learner will have a better appreciation of the content of the latter when both courses are taken.

 

Human Dynamics 2201

Human dynamic focuses on the family as a smaller ecosystem in the larger global ecosystem; the adolescent – a member of the family; dating, courtship, engagement, and marriage; child development and parenting. Emphasis is on child development, parenting, and financial management issues that will soon impact the lives of students.